32 Books Recommended by Margaret E. Atwood


Canadian poet

Margaret Eleanor Atwood (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, and environmental activist. She is a winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award, Prince of Asturias Award for Literature and the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade.

Famous for The Handmaid’s Tale


The Handmaid’s Tale is not only a radical and brilliant departure for Margaret Atwood, it is a novel of such power that the reader will be unable to forget its images and its forec…


  1. Time Travel by James Gleick

From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influenc…


2. Canada by Mike Myers

Comedy superstar Mike Myers writes from the (true patriot) heart about his 52-year relationship with his beloved Canada. Mike Myers is a world-renowned actor, director and writer,…


3. Journey To The Future by Guy Dauncey

In this blockbuster novel, young protagonist Patrick Wu visits a future world — Vancouver in 2032 — brimming with innovation and hope, where the climate crisis is being tackled, th…


4. Capital Letters by David Dowling

In the 1840s and 1850s, as the market revolution swept the United States, the world of literature confronted for the first time the gaudy glare of commercial culture. Amid growing…


5. The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

A richly moving new novel — the first since the author’s Booker Prize-winning, internationally celebrated debut, The God of Small Things, went on to become a beloved best seller and…


6. Speak by Louisa Hall

She cannot run. She cannot walk. She cannot even blink. As her batteries run down for the final time, all she can do is speak. Will you listen? Speak is the story of artificial int…


7. Float by Anne Carson

From the renowned classicist and MacArthur Prize winner: a brilliant new collection that explores myth and memory, beauty and loss, all the while playing with — and pushing — the lim…


8. The Palace of Dreams by Ismail Kadare

A sinister totalitarian ministry called the Palace of Dreams recruits Mark-Alem to sort, classify, and interpret the dreams of the people in the empire, seeking the “master-dreams”…


9. Words Are My Matter by Ursula K. Le Guin

A bright and wide-ranging collection of essays, reviews, talks, and more from one of our best and most thoughtful writers….


10. Under Another Sky by Charlotte Higgins

Shortlisted for the 2013 Samuel Johnson Prize, the Thwaites Wainwright Prize and the 2014 Dolman Travel Book Award This is a book about the encounter with Roman Britain: about what…


11. Gutenberg’s Fingerprint by Merilyn Simonds

An intimate narrative exploring the past, present, and future of books Four seismic shifts have rocked human communication: the invention of writing, the alphabet, mechanical type…


12. Boiling Point by Maude Barlow

“She has one of the most thorough and comprehensive understandings of her subject of anyone alive.” — Globe and Mail We are complacent. We bask in the idea that Canada holds 20% o…


13. The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen by Hope Nicholson

A woman’s place is saving the universe. Think comic books can’t feature strong female protagonists? Think again! In The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen you’ll meet the most fa…


14. Frontier City by Shawn Micallef

Toronto is emerging from an identity crisis into a glorious new era. It began as a series of reports from the civic drama of the 2014 elections. But beyond the municipal circus, wr…


15. Little Sister by Barbara Gowdy

The farthest place you can go is closer than you can imagine. Rose is a sensible woman, thirty-four years old. Together with her widowed mother, Fiona, she runs a small repertory c…


16. Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese

“A novel about the role of stories in our lives, those we tell ourselves about ourselves and those we agree to live by.” — Globe and Mail When Franklin Starlight is called to visit…


17. Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

A searing and profound Southern odyssey by National Book Award–winner Jesmyn Ward. In Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singul…


18. The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld

A haunting, richly atmospheric, and deeply suspenseful novel from the acclaimed author of The Enchanted about an investigator who must use her unique insights to find a missing lit…


19. The Written World by Martin Puchner

The story of literature in seventeen acts, from Alexander the Great and The Iliad to J. K. Rowling and Harry Potter, this wonderful book combines biography, history, and stories fr…


20. The Unwomanly Face of War by Svetlana Alexievich

A long-awaited English translation of the groundbreaking oral history of women in World War II across Europe and Russia — from the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature “A landmark…


21. Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-lodge

‘This is a book that was begging to be written. This is the kind of book that demands a future where we’ll no longer need such a book. Essential’ Marlon James, Man Booker Prize-Win…


22. Riot Days by Maria Alyokhina

A Pussy Rioter’s riveting, hallucinatory account of her years in Russia’s criminal system and of finding power in the most powerless of situations In February 2012, after smuggling…


23. Seven Fallen Feathers by Tanya Talaga

In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to…


24. The Clothesline Swing by Ahmad Danny Ramadan

The Clothesline Swing is a journey through the troublesome aftermath of the Arab Spring. A former Syrian refugee himself, Ramadan unveils an enthralling tale of courage that weaves…


25. The Magic Garment by Rebecca Cunningham


The Magic Garment focuses on the creative and practical skills that bring costumes from designer/director conferences to opening night — from styles of visual presentation and the use of fabric and materials, to developing skills in research, conceptualization, interpretation, and organization of budgeting, shopping, and scheduling. It explains how to draw and render costume sketches and how to apply different design principles to specific types of costumes. It exposes students to a broad range of theatrical literature and explains how to analyze plays from the costume designer’s perspective.…

26. Hot Art by Joshua Knelman

Sweeping and fast-paced, Hot Art is a major work of investigative journalism and a thrilling joyride into a mysterious criminal world. Hot Art traces Joshua…


27. A Field Guide to Reality by Joanna Kavenna

‘Extraordinary, wise, funny, adventurous’ A. L. Kennedy ‘So utterly startling and inventive, it’s almost an act of resistance’ Miriam Toews ‘I couldn’t put it down. A cult followin…


28. Something Is Always On Fire by Measha Brueggergosman

Opera sensation Measha Brueggergosman has moved audiences around the world with her unique gifts. Among her many triumphs, she has won Juno Awards, been nominated for a Grammy, sun…


29. American Housewife by Helen Ellis

A sharp, funny, delightfully unhinged collection of stories set in the dark world of domesticity, American Housewife features murderous ladies who lunch, celebrity treasure hunters…


30. The Tempest by William Shakespeare

Putting romance onstage, The Tempest gives us a magician, Prospero, a former duke of Milan who was displaced by his treacherous brother, Antonio. Prospero is exiled on an is…


31. My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | ONE OF O: THE OPRAH MAGAZINE’S TEN FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR | NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Harper’s Bazaar • St. Louis Post-Dispatch • P…


32. True Story by Michael Finkel


In February 2002, New York Times Magazine writer Michael Finkel received a startling piece of news: a young man named Christian Longo, wanted for killing his entire family, had been captured in Mexico, where he’d taken on a new identity: Michael Finkel of the New York Times. The next day, on page A-3 of the Times, came another troubling item: a note from the editors explaining that Finkel, having falsified parts of an investigative article, had been fired. Nonetheless, the only journalist Longo would speak with was the real Michael Finkel, and so Finkel placed a call to Oregon’s Lincoln County jail, intent on getting the true story. So began a bizarre and intense relationship — a reporting job that morphed into a shrewd game of cat-and-mouse. Part mystery, part memoir, part mea culpa, True Story weaves a spellbinding tale of murder, love, and deceit with a deeply personal inquiry into the slippery nature of truth.

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